HOW TO SELECT A DISCUS PAIR?

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DISCUS BREEDING: HOW TO SELECT A DISCUS PAIR?

(MYTHS AND FACTS IN PAIRING A DISCUS FISH)

Discus Fish, the king of Aquariums, has truly earned its royal reputation. The beauty of a Discus may be mesmerizing but it takes quite a few facts to succeed in breeding its royal bloodline. Breeding a Discus can be very rewarding but can also be confusing if one sticks to the myth and not to the facts. In this article, we will discuss the facts and myths on the selection of pairs in Discus Breeding.

HEADS UP!!!
Before you continue, let us first define FACT and MYTH!
MYTH – an idea or story that is believed by many people but that is NOT TRUE!
FACT – a thing or idea that is known or proved to be TRUE.
  • MYTH:
    It is really hard to pair up a Discus Fish!
  • FACT:
    In reality, Discus Fishes are quite easy to pair up. Discus Fishes are often sold by groups. In a group of six (6) mature Discus Fishes, chances of getting 2 pairs of Discus for breeding is very high!
  • MYTH:
    Noticing the pairing of two Discus Fishes is very rare and hard to notice.
  • FACT:
    The Discus Fishes will become inseparable once pairing starts. It is easily observed and will become territorial. Discus Fishes are territorial once a spawning site is selected. The pair will start cleaning the area to be able to lay eggs.
  • MYTH:
    Male and Female Discus Fish are hard to distinguish due to their vibrant colors.
  • FACT:
    The Male and Female Discus Fish can be distinguished when their spawning tube will begin to be visible. It can be easy to differentiate the Discus Fish’s sex because the female’s spawning tube is approximately 3mm and the male’s spawning tube is around 1-2mm. It is also noticeable that the female Discus Fish has a long blunt spawning tube while the male Discus Fish has a more pointed spawning tube.
  • MYTH:
    The female Discus Fish lays eggs and will also fertilize those eggs.
  • FACT:
    As the female Discus Fish makes a test run along the spawning area in preparation for laying eggs, the male will follow along behind her to fertilize the eggs. In other terms, the female will lay eggs while the male is responsible for fertilizing it. Note that, it is important the male doesn’t get distracted at this point.
  • MYTH:
    The process of laying eggs for Discus Fish is fast and predictable.
  • FACT:
    The truth is some pair of Discus Fish takes their time in preparing to lay eggs while others are quick in laying eggs. It takes approximately 60 hours for the Discus Fish eggs to hatch.
  • MYTH:
    Once the eggs are done hatching, the fry will begin to swim away immediately from the breeding site towards their parents.
  • FACT:
    It takes approximately 60 hours before the fry begin to swim away from the breeding site and hopefully towards the parents. It can be tricky but once the fry will begin to feed on the slime excreted from the parents sides, it means that all is well as of the moment.
  • MYTH:
    All Discus pair are proven breeding pair and can easily be found from any retailers.
  • FACT:
    Discus Fish pair can be at premium price especially if it is both healthy and attractive. A non Albino or non pigeon blood pair is strongly recommended for first attempt breeding. It also easier to start with the darker brown based fish like Virgin reds, Red covers, or a nice Turquoise pair.
  • MYTH:
    All kind of Discus Fish are cheap.
  • FACT:
    Discus Fish pair can be at premium price especially if it is both healthy and attractive. A non Albino or non pigeon blood pair is strongly recommended for first attempt breeding. It also easier to start with the darker brown based fish like Virgin reds, Red covers, or a nice Turquoise pair.
  • MYTH:
    Discus Fishes in group have faster process of pairing.
  • FACT:
    Pairing Discus Fish is recommended only if you are in no hurry. One can buy a group of 5 or more juvenile fish, and grow them out to adulthood. Chances are as the fish mature, pairs can be form from this grouping.
  • MYTH:
    Mixing Discus’s strains are recommended to avoid expenses.
  • FACT:
    Keeping sure that the same group of Discus Fish’s compatible strains is a must. It is not also recommended for beginners to keep mixing strains and it may result in ugly unsellable offspring.
  • MYTH:
    Discus Fishes are capable of breeding even with worst body conditions.
  • FACT:
    A healthy breeding pair is a must in creating a quality Discus Fish offspring. One should make sure that the selected pair is healthy, well fed, and free from any disease. A 5 ½” (female) to 6”+ (male) is the best Discus sizes for breeding.
  • MYTH:
    Discus Fishes are best if they are introduced suddenly to a breeding tank.
  • FACT:
    Breeding can be quite stressful for a Discus Fish pair. Before introducing to a breeding tank, it best to feed the pair with only the best foods that they like.

The Selection of Discus Pair for breeding is indeed a very valuable experience. Whatever the purpose of breeding these beautiful fishes, the process will teach you to value patience while having fun. Always remember to stick to the facts and don’t believe in myths!

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